Terminal Cancer Patient Survives After Undergoing Immune Cell Experimental Therapy


Immune cell viewed at the microscope

The experimental therapy used immune cells to fight tumors

A 52-year-old woman from Florida diagnosed with terminal breast cancer has now managed to beat the disease after following an experimental therapy. When doctors first discovered her tumor, they told the woman she had only got three months to live. However, by using white cells right from her own body, they managed to beat the cancer and live the woman as healthy as before.

The woman was given only three months to live

When Judy Perkins was diagnosed with breast cancer, the doctors did all they could to stop the tumors from spreading. They removed her lymph nodes, performed a full mastectomy, and then had the woman undergo hormonal therapy. Unfortunately, this wasn’t enough, as the cancer started spreading.

Soon afterwards, doctors discovered the cancer had already reached her liver. At this stage, they told Perkins there was nothing else they could do and gave her three months left to live. However, Dr. Steven Rosenberg from the National Institutes of Health thought of an experimental therapy that could work.

The experimental therapy used immune cells to annihilate the cancer

Dr. Rosenberg started studying the immune cells of the patient and carefully selected those that could combat genetic mutations. They extracted all these cells and harvested them in a lab until they produced about 90 billion. Afterwards, they injected Perkins with them, and the method seemed to work.

In about ten days, the woman said she started feeling her tumor a lot softer. When she went to the doctor to had it checked, they confirmed the unbelievable. The experimental therapy fought her cancer, prevented it from spreading, and removed it from the woman’s body. This method worked so well because it used live cells that immediately became part of the patient’s body.

However, the treatment isn’t yet ready for wide use. There are still plenty of risks associated with it, and it might not work for any type of terminal cancer. However, Dr. Rosenberg is optimistic and thinks this is a huge step in the field of cancer research. Using white cells to annihilate cancer cells is a non-toxic method that really stops the cells from growing.

Image source: Pixabay


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Melissa Whitney

We asked our colleague, Melissa Whitney, why she chose Journalism for a profession. She gave us one of the best answers we’ve heard so far: she feels it’s her duty to let future nations know how humanity lived at some point in history. Her articles are, for that matter, incredibly accurate and well-informed, but they do not lack that personal touch that readers need to get to know the writer better.

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