WHO Officially Includes Gaming Disorder on Its List of Diseases


Person holding a video game controller

Gaming disorder is now an official disease

Technology is indispensable in our lives now, but there’s a thin line between regular and excessive use. Among the online content that gets people hooked, video games really make plenty of victims. As a result, the World Health Organization (WHO) has finally categorized gaming disorder as a real disease.

Video game addiction is a reality

This week, WHO will perform a new edit of the International Classification of Diseases. Recently, it gave more attention to technology use and its potential harmful effects. Any kind of technology can become addicting, but the organization concluded that video games are the most likely to make victims.

Therefore, the new version of the disease classification will include gaming disorder as well. This comes after many people expressed their concern on the harmful effects of video games, but it’s also an attempt to reduce online content consumption. Also, if it’s an official disease, addicted gamers might be more eager to receive the help they need.

There are about 2.6 billion people in the world who play video games regularly. Most of them are casual users, but there are a few who get really hooked on the game. When this happens, they start neglecting other aspects of their lives, spending way too much time in front of their computer screen. At this point, it’s clear these people have a problem.

The inclusion of gaming disorder should improve our methods of treatment

However, people shouldn’t feel ashamed because of WHO’s initiative. The inclusion of gaming disorder is an attempt to make everyone understand game addiction is real. If the disorder is categorized like a real disease, it will become easier for people to get help. Therapists can develop better methods to deal with video game addiction, while insurance companies can offer compensations for it.

There are plenty of video games that keep players stuck to a screen. Most people choose to ignore their other needs while playing, so they can easily develop many other problems from gaming disorder. With the advance of games of the battle royale type, we should also improve our methods of treatment.

Image source: Pexels


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Gary Meyer

Gary Meyer is a passionate Creative Writer. He has recently graduated the Mississippi State University where he has studied to become an even more talented word crafter. We think he has successfully done that, judging by the elaborate articles he writes on subjects related to social sciences and health.

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